The History of Future Space – Orbit 10.24

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Jim Cantrell, CEO of Vector Space Systems joins us again to talk about the history of New Space, its origins and where we are now. We also talk a bit about Vector and its agressive plan to launch more times in one year than the rest of the world combined.

In Space News:

  • ALMA Views Betelgeuse Directly
    Roll-Out Solar Array Experiment (ROSA) Deploys on ISS
    First Orbiting Supermassive Black Holes Discovered
    Sounding Rocket Finally Creates Light Show
    18 Months Later, Planet 9’s Hunt Is Inconclusive
  • TMRO:Space is a crowd funded show. If you like this episode consider contributing to help us to continue to improve. Head over to http://www.patreon.com/tmro for information, goals and reward levels.

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    6 Comments

    1. […] The latest TMRO.tv program is available from the archive: The History of Future Space – Orbit 10.24 – TMRO […]

    2. John Eric Thompson on July 3, 2017 at 5:49 pm

      Yep same person just different week :-).

      I love listening to your shows while working away.
      Space X number nine was stopped just 9 seconds before liftoff. I hope Mondays re-launch during the same time envelope is successful.

    3. John Eric Thompson on July 5, 2017 at 11:40 pm

      3rd attempt successful with Space X Falcon 9.:-)

    4. DougSpace on July 6, 2017 at 2:41 pm

      The key question for the Moon is not whether it is a necessary step to Mars but whether it is a legitimate destination for settlement in its own right. NASA’s LCROSS mission shows that it is. If recycling, a person needs about a kilogram of volatiles a day. There are enough volatiles on the Moon for a city of a million for about 1,600 years.* And also, the LCROSS results show that there is enough carbon and nitrogen if one recycles those as well.

      * 600 million tonnes x 1,000 kg/tonne x 1 kg /day/person X 1 yr/365 days = 1,643 years.

    5. DougSpace on July 6, 2017 at 2:44 pm

      The Moon is closer, safer, and cheaper than Mars. As a legitimate destination for settlement in its own right, it therefore stands to reason that humanity’s first permanent foothold should be established there.

      • John Eric Thompson on July 7, 2017 at 6:14 pm

        I agree with you Doug 🙂

        There are so many things that still need to be tested and verified before venturing off to Mars with humans.

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